Be Stress Free With a Google Classroom Test Class

google-classroom-test-class

A Google Classroom test class can make designing a course stress free. It is true that Google Classroom is an exceptional Learning Management System that simplifies teaching and learning. However, it does take time to master all the features.

Before jumping into developing your first course, take a pause, and give yourself time to explore. Try things out. Here is the best piece of advice I was given and am passing onto you…

Create a Test Class and a Fake Student

To reduce stress, get started with Google Classroom by creating a “test” class. When done, join a few “fake” students to the class. If you are unsure how to complete this step refer to the TechnoKids Google Classroom support page. It explains how to create a class and how to join one.

Just like the students you teach – you want learning how to use Google Classroom to be a fun experience. A test class and fake students will let you play around without pressure. There is no risk of your real students receiving live posts (which in some cases can be difficult to delete). Instead, you are safe to explore and discover.

Option 1: Use Multiple Devices to be Both the Teacher and Student

If you have access to multiple devices, sign into one as the teacher and the other as the student. You can then observe the difference between what the teacher and student see within Google Classroom. This exploration will also provide you with the ability to help your class view announcements, open assignments, submit work, and view grades because you will be familiar with their experience.

Option 2: Use Multiple Browsers to be Both the Teacher and Student

If you only have access to one device, the best way to explore Google Classroom is to use multiple browsers. This lets you pretend to be two (or more) people at the same time. For example, you could use Google Chrome to sign into Google Classroom as the teacher. You can then use the Edge or Firefox to sign into Google Classroom as a fake student. This will let you switch back and forth between users.

Practice Assigning, Completing, and Grading Assignments

One of the most important things you need to know how to do in Google Classroom is create assignments. Go through the process, switching roles from the teacher to the student. This will allow you to understand each step.

  1. Teacher – Create an assignment.
  2. Student – Open the assignment. Complete the task.
  3. Student – Turn in the assignment.
  4. Teacher – Access a turned in assignment.
  5. Teacher – Evaluate assignment and provide comments.
  6. Student – View grade.

Getting Google Classroom Help

Create Assignments: Refer to Create Assignments with TechnoKids Files if you need guidance with setting up assignments. Although these instructions refer directly to TechnoKids worksheets and resources, the information and screenshots are generic and are applicable to any assignment. The blog post, A Simple Trick to Creating a Google Classroom Assignment, will help you attach resources to Google Classroom assignments.

Complete an Assignment and Turn In: While pretending to be the student, if you require help understanding how to complete different types of assignments refer to Complete an Assignment. These instructions explain how to execute a range of tasks. In addition, the steps illustrate students working with a PDF worksheet, template, new file, and more!

Evaluate Student Work: If you need help assessing student work, refer to View and Grade Student Work. These instructions detail how to open a completed assignment, allocate a grade, post a comment, and then return the work.

View Grade from Teacher: While pretending to be the student, if you need assistance to open returned work, refer to View Marks and Comments. These instructions outline how to open an assignment, view the posted grade, and read private comments.

Christa Love

Christa Love, Curriculum Developer & Teacher ~ I am passionate about blending technology into curriculum. Whether it is programming, video production, graphic design, or digital citizenship, I am interested in how apps and tools can be used to enhance learning. Throughout the years I have designed many TechnoKids technology projects. My favorite part of curriculum development is field-testing the ideas to determine the activities that work best in real classrooms. I write about what I have learned that can save teachers time in their own curriculum planning.

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