Webcam Tips

webcam sitesWhat do you think about using webcams as part of your curriculum unit? Read each statement.

  1. I want my class to learn Internet search skills.
  2. My students can’t find any good webcam sites.
  3. We have wasted lots of time in the computer lab using webcam sites.
If you answered 1, 2, or 3 read on!
Here are some tips for you and your students when looking for webcam sites:
  • Use effective keywords to search: Here are some ideas to use as search terms to find webcam sites. Bookmark your favorites!
  • museum webcam underwater webcam railway webcam ski webcam
    zoo cams theme park webcam traffic webcam live New York webcam
    live street camera Hawaii webcam beach webcam national park webcam
  • Unable to see webcam: Some web pages place an online form or advertising over top of the camera. You must close the form or ad before you can see the webcam.
  • Use government webcams: Some web pages have too many advertisements. However, government web pages tend to have no advertising.
  • Visit well-known places: Famous museums, national parks, theme parks, and landmarks tend to have quality webcams that work.
  • Use the word “live”: To avoid viewing static pictures use the word live in your search word so that you will only find real-time video.
  • Consider the time of day: Webcams are from around the world. While you are awake, in other parts of the world the people might be asleep. If you view a webcam in the middle of the night, it is likely to be dark or there may not be anything happening.
  • Be patient: You might be viewing a webcam from very far away. It can take time for the webcam to load on the web page.
  • Webcam time limits: Some websites restrict the amount of time you can watch the webcam feed. Some will force you to refresh the page before it can be viewed again.

digital citizenship TechnoJourney teaches students how to explore the Internet safely. Collect stamps on your passport as you journey online. Learn digital citizenship, Internet safety, search strategies, research skills, and more. Read more about TechnoJourney, see sample lessons, learning objectives, and teacher reviews here.

TechnoHella

About TechnoHella

Hella Comat, Curriculum Writer - Hella Comat is a dedicated professional, who has taught in the education system for more than 30 years. As a pioneer of technology integration in Ontario public schools she was one of the first teachers to introduce the internet, video conferencing, web design, and multimedia learning activities to teachers and students in the Halton Board. To inspire teachers to use technology, she has led sessions for the Touch Technology program, ran workshops at education conferences, and sat on numerous advisory committees related to technology-issues. In recent years she taught the Computer in the Classroom course, at York University. Her lifelong commitment to teaching and learning was acknowledged when she was honored as the recipient of the Prime Minister’s Award for Teaching Excellence in Science, Technology, and Mathematics. Hella's contribution to the blog includes entries about the importance of technology integration. Drawing from her in-depth knowledge of technology in the classroom Hella writes about teaching strategies and useful resources that can benefit your practice. In addition, she provides innovative lesson ideas that you can implement into your own curriculum.